Dr J J Kempster

Position:Research Fellow
Projects:ATLAS
E-mail:
Room:West 322
Phone:(012141)44235
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Summary

Jacob Kempster is a postdoctoral research fellow on the ATLAS experiment in the Birmingham Particle Physics Group.
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Education

Jacob completed his PhD in Particle Physics at Royal Holloway, University on London, entitled Measurements of charge and CP asymmetries in b-hadron decays using top-quark events collected by the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at s = 8 TeV (2017).

Research

His area of expertise is in the study of the properties of the top quark as a window to new physics. He completed the first ever study of CP violation in the heavy-flavour sector using top quarks from LHC data as a production mechanism, and utilising the tagging of semileptonic decays of B-hadrons via the identification of resultant soft muons (Link to paper).
He actively contributes to measurements of top-quark spin correlation, charge asymmetry and mass.
Jacob also has experience in the development of trigger algorithms in data-acquisition systems, in the installation of the ATLAS 3rd generation read-out systems, and in the development and testing of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors. In addition he has a growing interest in fundamental research for machine learning and artifical intelligence and its applications in both particle physics and the industrial sector (NMLVI).

Teaching

Jacob has worked as a one-to-one tutor for undergraduate students, and is presently running a Year 3 undergraduate 'Group Studies' course designed to provide real collaborative experience to students working on open questions for the design and simulation of future particle physics experiments.

Outreach

Jacob has been involved in several student outreach projects conducting physics experiments both on university sites and in schools, and presented during the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition in London on the discovery of the Higgs boson. He was also an official underground guide for public and VIP visits to the ATLAS experimental cavern for 2 years during his long-term attachment at CERN, Switzerland.